The Brain And Addiction what-is-addiction

Changes In The Brain Because Of Addictive Substances

Addictive drugs normally alter the brain over a certain period. When dependence grows, alterations in the brain make exploiters place substance above everything else.


When one becomes addicted, their brain is practically redesigned to depend on the drugs even with their effects. Physical symptoms of drug abuse usually diminish over time, but circumstances or feelings connected to past addiction may bring back desires later in life Nevertheless, breaking the addiction is not beyond your reach. But patients should understand that treatment is a continuous process. Treatment for addiction is evolving every day and has steadily become better over the years. If you or an individual you love is fighting to defeat dependence, acquire aid straight away.


Development Of Addictions

The human brain is an intricate organ managing all willing and unwilling step we embrace. Our attitude, breathing, how we think and decide on issues, and other important skills are dictated by the brain. The limbic system puts out chemicals that elevate the mood of the user when an addictive substance is taken. This boosts the desire to continue using the substance. Real changes have happened in the limbic system that cause the overwhelming, uncontrollable urge to use the substance, no matter what harm it may cause. The most important thing is now the desire to take the drug.


There is a section of the brain in charge of addiction. This section of the brain is known as the limbic system. The limbic system, also referred to as " reward system for the brain" is responsible for the pleasure emotions.



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Igniting The Brain Reward System

The ill-use of addictive drugs sparks off the brain reward system. Activating the reward system on a frequent basis can cause addiction. When we engage in activities that are beneficial for us, the brain reward system will automatically become operational. This naturally helps us to change and survive. Anytime this system is activated, the brain concludes that an activity requiring survival is taking place. In that case, the brain rewards that activity by making one feel good.


Drinking water when are thirsty, for instance, sparks off the reward system, therefore, we repeat this conduct. Addictive drugs cause enjoyable emotions for behaviour that is dangerous and harming to a person, triggering the reward system falsely. The brain reward system becomes powerless against these drugs.


Addiction Biochemistry

One of the most significant parts of the reward system is dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the reward system and is a naturally produced chemical in the brain. Addictive substances act like dopamine or trigger its excessive production in the brain once they get into the reward system.

Because the dopamine they produce is insignificant, regular activities like food, music, sex, and drinking, do not alter the brain and cause dependence although they can switch on the reward system.

The dopamine released by addictive substances can be up to 10 times more than the amount released from normal actions.

Drugs utilize floods neuroreceptors with dopamine. The "high" that comes with substance abuse is the consequence. The human brain can't create regular dopamine levels normally after prolonged and constant substance abuse. The reward system becomes enslaved by the addictive substances.

Dopamine levels should go back to the original level, this triggers the desire for addictive substances. Not taking the drug automatically leads to despondency for such addicts.


Neurofeedback In Dependency

Neurofeedback is gaining footing as a treatment for addiction. It is also referred to as (EEG)Electroencephalogram, Biofeedback. To improve the performance of the brain, the brain is trained by using neurofeedback. At the time of this procedure, the administrator of the treatment checks the brains actions through using sensors to the scalp. When the brain changes its own activities for the better and to more healthier routines, the administrator rewards it.

Underlying issues that may be leading to addiction are targeted by neurofeedback, like

  • Intense sadness
  • Panicking
  • Severe depression
  • Insomnia

Neurofeedback has shown that it is a great treatment for drug dependency with numerous patients by helping the brain comprehend how to function without drugs. Neurofeedback is often a part of a complete treatment plan by some treatment facilities. To reach a centre that can help you, please call us now on 0800 246 1509.