Alcoholics Anonymous support-groups

Alcoholics Anonymous And The Beginning


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. Alcoholics Anonymous provides moral support to people that are trying to stop alcoholism and it started its operation in 1935. There are 12 traditions that were put in place to help define the reason for the group's existence but first, the famous 12 steps were introduced to help give the meetings some direction. Many former alcoholics believe the group was instrumental in helping them remain sober and the group still uses the original 12 steps in its meetings.


Today, Alcoholics Anonymous has more than 2,000,000 active members all over the world and more than 50 thousand of support groups countrywide.


What To Expect From AA

It is always quite challenging the first time you go for the meeting if you are not aware of what goes on there. It requires the individual to venture out of his or her comfort zone and admit before a room full of strangers that they have a problem and need some assistance to get better. This feeling is felt by most of the people you'll encounter in the meetings. AA was founded by recovering alcohol addicts and its model has remained till today. Every individual within AA has been through a problem before and has cultivated a unique feeling of community and understanding among recovering alcoholics.


All attendees of the group will be welcomed with open arms during an AA meeting. They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. The meeting participants know from experience that a new member may not find talking about themselves readily at first. As time passes by most attendees become comfortable with the great healing and therapy, they receive through the open and honest discussions which are provided by these meetings.


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Closed And Open Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

Partners, family and pals are allowed to attend open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. Some people have shown a marked preference to keep their recovery segregated from the rest of their lives. There those who need family and friends to be there when they attend the meetings.


12 Stages Of Recovery

Alcoholics Anonymous is the first group that came up with the 12 stages of achieving addiction recovery which is currently being used by other communities. The steps are meant to be followed as a cycle although they are listed linearly. Some of the steps mentioned could be revisited until the recovering alcoholic is comfortable during that stage of their recovery process.

One starts with acknowledging they are having a problem and they cannot solve it on their own. Subsequently, the steps include making decisions to quit, accepting yourselves and others the wrongs which may have been committed, making amends for the wrongdoings along with making a commitment to improve continually. To find out more about the 12 steps, go here.


Objections To AA

Some people do not want to attend the gatherings because of excuses. Some of the common oppositions which people have in mind are

  • They are not convinced the meetings can help them
  • They do not want to risk meeting someone they know
  • They aren't sure they really have a problem

Knowing the main objective of attending the meeting will help you overcome some of these excuses and recover from your addiction.

The bottom line out here is that if you feel there is a problem you are probably right. Attending a meeting can possibly save you from years of heartache caused by your alcoholism it can in no way be harmful.


Finding An Alcoholics Anonymous Group Near You

The AA groups are widespread everywhere and you will definitely find one near you. There is usually a schedule of meetings for each group; it is best to join as soon as you can. Our meeting finder can help you to locate a group near you depending on whether you're looking for an open or closed meeting. If you're looking for an AA group, we can assist you to find one just contact 0800 246 1509.